Inktober 2019 - week 1

For Inktober this year, I’m trying to make 30 different sketches describing flying trilobites. I’ll add to each weekly post as they progress. Follow me @FlyingTrilobite on Twitter and Instagram each day.

Here’s week one.

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Welcome to A Field Guide to Flying Trilobites. We hope you learn something from our team of unruly-haired naturalists wearing smart coats stained with ink, as they share what they’ve gathered in the field.

Day 2 - This flying fruit bat-hunting trilobite (Paralejurus artibeus) has large compound eyes for nocturnal vision and wing claws that aid in coral crawling.

Day 2 - This flying fruit bat-hunting trilobite (Paralejurus artibeus) has large compound eyes for nocturnal vision and wing claws that aid in coral crawling.

Day 3 - The common “flying” trilobite, Olenellus exocoetidae, glides above the waves on diaphanous fins.  It is now endangered due to the myth that the the wings have fertility properties.

Day 3 - The common “flying” trilobite, Olenellus exocoetidae, glides above the waves on diaphanous fins.

It is now endangered due to the myth that the the wings have fertility properties.

Day 4 - Tiny, blind, and highly invasive due to wind-dispersal when mature. Acadagnostus taraxacum, from A Guide to Flying Trilobites.

Paleontologists suspect the Brazilian pterosaur Tupandactylus adorned their colourful crests with clay-red trilobites, and refer to these as “Calymene carnivalis”.

An aggressive, late-summer flying trilobite, Huntonia vespid makes its nest high in the trees, curiously never patrolling lower than 3m above the ground.

Following the clean energy revolution of the 2020s, the “peppered trilobite” saw a shift to a darker variant, that warmed itself on solar panels in the evening.