Trying Something Bold


Pretty soon I plan to have a new website portfolio and probably even an integrated blog. I may be leaving my 7 year home here on Blogspot pretty soon.

Above is a logo, badge icon thingee I'm trying out.

The two contenders for my future website are Squarespace and newcomer with mystery future-features Artstation. More about all of this soon. 

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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite © to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

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Find me on Symbiartic, the art+science blog on the Scientific American Blog Network!

S I X

One. 


Two. 

Three. 

Four. 

Five. 

And now, 
Six. 



The Flying Trilobite blog is six years old today. 

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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite © to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

Portfolio
Blog
Print Shop

Find me on Symbiartic, the art+science blog on the Scientific American Blog Network!

Illustrating Vaccine Stories on Symbiartic



Over the weekend I was blogging on Symbiartic, the art+science blog I share with Kalliopi Monoyios. My focus was on images that undercut the scientific message they are trying to relay, specifically using posts about vaccines and pro-vaccination outreach. 

The comment threads are pretty lively and the discussion continued on Twitter and G+. 

Head over to Symbiartic to read, Pro-Vaccine Communication: You're Doing It Wrong.
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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite © to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

Portfolio
Blog
Print Shop

Find me on Symbiartic, the art+science blog on the Scientific American Blog Network!

Successful Start for My New Portfolio!

Hey hey! I'm excited. 48 hours in, my domain URL not fully migrated yet, and already I've had over 1200 views on my new site. Thanks everyone! 


Finally got fed-up enough with the lack of statistics and support from DeviantArt about their Portfolio service -I really think they've abandoned developing it- so I decided to hunt around and give Blogger's Dynamic Views another try.

I've complained about my problems with DeviantArt Portfolios before, and played with Dynamic Views before.

I decided to go with the Flipcard view to start, and then hunted around to see what other artist-bloggers may have done to tweak the service.

I found a terrific tutorial by fantasy art illustrator Dan Dos Santos on the stellar Muddy Colors blog that solved about 90% of my desired tweaks.

Then, I remembered a great blog for css tweaks to Dynamic Views I had found months ago when messing around, Southern Speakers.

The changes and tweaks were quick and easy, just a couple of hours. Uploading the art and adding links took a while longer. The great thing is, unlike DeviantArt Portfolios, I can have links to my online store, and buttons for tweets and +1 and Likes right below the art.

Note the links to blog posts, my online store, and buttons to +1, tweet or Like. Niftiness!

There seems to be a delay with my glendonmellow.com migrating to URL to mask the site - but clicking on www.glendonmellow.com seems to work fine for most people.

If you'd like to see the old site for comparisons' sake, it's still there. I really admire the set-up DeviantArt Portfolios had going, but it wasn't flexible and the lack of statistics really bothered me.

Thanks for checking out my new home!


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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite © to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

Portfolio
Blog
Print Shop

Find me on Symbiartic, the art+science blog on the Scientific American Blog Network!

Pinterest Terms of Service link round-up


After posting recently about Pinterest, I've been involved in a lot of discussion about their Terms of Service.  Here's a quick link primer to some of the discussions I'm involved in and I'm seeing in the science-art blogosphere.

To recap:

Pinterest does a lot of things right: links back to creator's sites, deleted pins get deleted on all subsequent re-pins - these are good things.

Pinterest has some problems: most people pin whatever neato things they find online when the Terms specifically state you must own the image or have permission. So it's built on misuse in many ways. Personally I think more artists should use Creative Commons type attitudes toward this type of sharing. But the point stands that most users violate Pinterest's own Terms of Service.

Pinterest has some Peril: they can "sell" and "otherwise exploit" all content according to their Terms of Service. So if you use it correctly, you're giving away your work which then involves risk assessment.

Read through these links to get the whole picture so far.

Pinterest gets right what Tumblr got wrong - The Flying Trilobite by Glendon Mellow

The Promise and Perils of Pinterest - Symbiartic by Glendon Mellow

-->Discussion on G+
-->Discussion on Scientific American's Facebook Page

Pinterest's Terms of Service, Word by Terrifying Word _Symbiartic by my co-blogger, Kalliopi Monoyios.

ART Evolved is a No-Pin Zone, sadly... -ART Evolved by administrator Craig Dylke. I'm affiliated with ART Evolved but I wasn't involved in this decision beforehand, for the record. Good move though.

*****Edit: It was announced on March 23rd 2012 that Pinterest is indeed dropping the "sell" term in their Terms of Service - as well as making many other changes. Storify below takes place as of time of the original post.

Pinterest updates Terms of Service - drops the "sell" - Symbiartic by Glendon Mellow



For those not on Twitter, after the jump I've included a first attempt at a Storify of some of the comments there.



There's a lot of retweets of some of these, so a lot of people are listening who haven't weighed in.




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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

Portfolio
Blog
Print Shop

--> Find me on Symbiartic, the art+science blog on the new Scientific American Blog Network!

Pinterest gets right what Tumblr got wrong


Follow Me on Pinterest

I've started making boards on 
Pinterest, a fascinating new site that I think is going to be a big thing for artists. 

Attributing artwork is something I believe to of huge importance, not just the letter of the copyright laws, but also attributing art to artists who've dead for hundreds of years. I've written about it *ahem* a few times. (Thisthisthisthis...)

Here on Blogger, if I want to re-share some artwork, I need to save it to my drive, and re-upload it. There's a bit of work involved. So attributing the art is just a tiny step, and one I think is more likely for bloggers to do since they're crafting a whole post. 

While there are ways to effectively use Tumblr and be respectful of creators, as I've written before, it's easy to lose track of a creator of an image and have it shared and re-shared thousands of time without attribution. The reblog button makes the initial person's mistake too easy to replicate.  In part, I created the Trilobite Boy Tumblr to get a handle on how Tumblr works. You can attach an url that would follow the artwork, but it's not mandatory. So tons of people just blog away, and creators lose all credit for their images all too often. 

Enter the new site Pinterest. 







Pinterest was first on my radar when my wife mentioned it looked interesting for sharing artwork. Then, via Twitter, I read ZDNet's "Why small business can't afford to overlook Pinterest". I maintain a Twitter feed for a national retailer, and thought this was right on the mark. But I like to test things with my own accounts before bringing it to clients. Then, my friend and fantastic artist Eric Orchard started in on it in a big way. He has a good eye for effective media for artists.

Pinterest takes the responsibility of attribution away from the user: I'm using it in Chrome, and I placed a little button on my Bookmarks bar. If I'm on a site, and wish to pin an inspiring piece of artwork onto one of my themed bulletin Boards (say, "science art that inspires me") then I click on the Pin It button, and Pinterest creates a screen that has all the images from that webpage on it. I pick the one I want, click, write a description if I wish, and post on the board. There's the option to tweet or Facebook-stream it too.

But the best part? Anyone else following that bulletin board of mine who decides to pin it on their board, will still have the original link to the original website functional if someone clicks on the art itself. The more artwork is shared on Pinterest, the more potential hits the blog, gallery or website will have.

Pinterest got respect for creators right. And they made it so easy.



You can find my Pinterest at http://pinterest.com/flyingtrilobite

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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

Portfolio
Blog
Print Shop 

--> Find me on Symbiartic, the art+science blog on the new Scientific American Blog Network!

Red Knot in Flight


While I'm working on a series of scientific illustrations I can't reveal yet, I thought I'd re-post this pencil (and the oils below) of a red knot in flight.  






Originally created for biologist and conservationist Dan Rhoads' excellent and vital Migrations blog, you can read more about it at his site, and my two-part making-of, here and here

Dan fights the good fight to save birds from the heinous hunting practices of migratory birds in his adopted home of Cyprus. You can sign the petition to stop the practice here.  



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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

Portfolio
Blog
Print Shop

--> Find me on Symbiartic, the art+science blog on the new Scientific American Blog Network!

Dog's Full Moon

Dog's Full Moon © Glendon Mellow

Aroooooooo!

Here's a quick ArtRage 3.5 painting I did for Jason Goldman's excellent blog, The Thoughtful Animal.

Jason takes a look at the urban legend that dogs are more prone to biting humans during the full moon in his post, Real-Life Werewolves? Dog Bites and Full Moons.
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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

Portfolio
Blog
Print Shop 

--> Find me on Symbiartic, the art+science blog on the new Scientific American Blog Network!

Illustration blogging: why it's essential - a SONSI discussion

This post is mainly a supplementary series of links and points accompanying our discussion, "Illustration blogging: why it's essential" at SONSI's 2011 Presentation Day





"...The big problem isn't piracy, it's obscurity." - Cory Doctorow after Tim O-Reilly.

What is a blog?
-Definitions

-Creators, Groups and Curators (example1 example2 example3)
-Netiquette in the blogosphere (blogrolls, rss feeds)

Selected reading: Blogs: face the conversation, by Bora Zivkovic, A Blog Around the Clock.

Why do artists and illustrators need a blog?

-Self-promotion (Art Mondays)
-Community (#10oclockart)
-Who is it for? (remember the audience, pull back the curtain)

A brief note on the preciousness of your images: Let it go.
-Creative Commons Licences
-dying of exposure vs hoarding

Selected reading:
In the digital era free is easy, so how do you persuade people to pay? by Cory Doctorow, The Guardian. 

What do we want copyright to do? by Cory Doctorow, the Guardian.

Images.  

-How accurate is possible? 
-What are they for? Illustrating a point, showing off work, hoping for new work?
-The problem with heavy watermarks and disabling right-clicking.
Selected reading: How Not To Display Your Artwork on the Web, Charley Parker, Lines and Colors.

A brief note on the preciousness of your images: Protect everyone.
-TinEye
-Google Reverse Image Search
Selected reading: It's time for Illustrators to take back the Net, by Glendon Mellow, Symbiartic.

Common Blog Platforms

-Blogger
-Wordpress

-Tumblr
-Building a blog. Let's make one right now in session.
-Blogger Dynamic Views

Widgets and stats.

Twitter - Microblogging.



G+ - Why Google+ is the new hotness.
-A quick look 
-Circles

Why illustrators need to blog. Summary and further discussion.

A couple of fun links.
Should I work for free - Flowchart by Jessica Hische
See something, cite something - Flowchart by Rosscott, Inc.

If you attended the discussion and would like clarification or help with anything we discussed, comment or email me!  Happy to help.




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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

Portfolio
Blog
Print Shop 

--> Find me on Symbiartic, the art+science blog on the new Scientific American Blog Network!