New Painting: The Last Refuge

At ScienceOnline'09, a few minutes after arriving and meeting Kevin Zelnio of Deep Sea News (and Miriam and Southern Fried and Karen James - I was barely there two minutes and all these cool bloggers were talking out loud), Kevin pitched an idea for a painting he wanted to give as a gift.

He found the occasion, and commissioned the painting. He also came up with a great title: The Last Refuge.

I should have a "making of" up over the next couple of days. In the meantime, head over to Deep Sea News and see the emotional and personal investment Kevin has wrapped up in the gesture of giving art in awe of science.

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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under
Creative Commons Licence.

Flying Trilobite Gallery *** Flying Trilobite Reproduction Shop ***

I felt like I was taking a real chance with the halo and beams of light.
But it was so
Symbolist, and so perfect for finding creatures long
thought gone, huddled in the dark around stygian heat...

Art Monday: Life as a Trilobite

One of my personal favourite paintings. Click to enlarge. Below, detail views.

Life as a Trilobite Oil on canvas, early 2000's.
Detail view also available in my print shop as a greeting card or in a variety of fine art print formats. Originally debuted on The Flying Trilobite here. Tricky to photograph, as I poured stand oil over the surface giving it a mottled, organic look that reflects light strangely.

I'm working on some new images with a variation of this character called "Flying Trilobite Boy" - I'm adding wings.




- - - - - - - -
Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

Flying Trilobite Gallery *** Flying Trilobite Reproduction Shop ***

But sadly, no trilobites...


Antarctic 'treasure trove' found, reported by Rebecca Morelle, BBC News


This story has some incredible pics of lifeforms no one knew were down there. What else lurks in the depths? And when will an ocean-going creature be named after Cthulhu? Follow the above link and check out the cephalopod pic.

Chances are it's not going to be trilobites. They did become extinct approximately 275 million years ago, so even a coelacanth-style, living-fossil comeback is not likely. But it would be nice. (Peace out, Richard Fortey.)

*sigh*