Fossil Gears









One of the highlights during our road trip from Toronto to Halifax was spending a night at atheist-political-sciencey blogger Lousy Canuck's place. Jason and Jodi were kind enough to put our travelling caravan up for the night and introduce us to the wonder of Portal 2. 

To thank @lousycanuck and @pixelsnake for their hospitality, I repainted one of the paintings on slate from my (now-dismantled) final school project into this new work, Fossil Gears

The visit was far too short. We need to meet up again some time! 


Flying Trilobite, left, Lousy Canuck, right.



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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite © to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

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Forgotten art for a late night.



Taking apart a room due to some slight water damage. Listening to Stromkern (thanks Stephanie!) and Wolfsheim. Here's some of my slate pieces from my final school project scanned and converted to black and white. I almost put this image in my latest print collection, and then skipped it and forgot about it.


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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

Art Monday: slate fragments



Some of the dismantled pieces from my 
final undergrad project.

It's funny, after the discussion it provoked I have ended up dismantling it anyway.  I kind of like the pieces, and I'm going to experiment with ways of hanging them on the wall.  This is the type of slate pieces I've been thinking I may put into my eventual Etsy shop.

I kind of like how the slight difference in thickness of the bottom piece of slate ("gears") causes all buy the center to become blurry.  Depth of field is funny with scanners.

Here's an up close picture of my brushstrokes on that creepy eye. You can see I didn't use white, I instead used naples yellow and naples yellow red, which I think give it a tired feel.

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Original artwork on
The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under
Creative Commons Licence.

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Blog
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Medium overriding the message?


When presenting the final project of my undergrad here on The Flying Trilobite, (see the process here: one, two, three, four and five) some excellent points have been raised in the comments of the last post.

My Art Evolved peeps Craig and Peter have been discussing whether or not unconventional mediums (like a wooden cube with busted slate tiles painted and hanging from wire) end up muddying the message more than conventional, easier to read forms.

Here are a couple of more photos, different from the the last post in that they show off the individual paintings more:
Click to enlarge.

This picture was taken on a weird angle. Sorry.


It was an interesting experience for me to have some of my artwork turn off someone for being post-modern and medium-focused. Typically, I am a painter in love with creating representational, realistic paintings.

As Craig pointed out, the medium is the message. We see here not only a 3D series of paintings hanging in a cube, we see them through the lens of a camera and displayed on a computer screen. It's very removed from say, Darwin Took Steps, a much more 2D picture which translates better through scanning and being online.

How much can the presentation enhance or interfere? Would video of a 3D object present better online, panning, zooming and with soft techno music in the background? Would it be clearer to scan individual pieces and present them as head-on photos?

Is this presentation in the immortal words of Mo the bartender, "po-mo; postmodern; weird for the sake of weird" or is something more getting across?

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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under
Creative Commons Licence.


Flying Trilobite Gallery *** Flying Trilobite Reproduction Shop ***

Next time on The Flying Trilobite: my interpretive dance fossil project!

Final. Art. Project. *gasp*


Top view.

Front view.
More after the jump...




Back view.

Peeking inside.

A look from the back.

Side view of the paint dripping down.


© Glendon Mellow 2010
Mixed media: oil paint on slate, acrylic string gel, wood, wire


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This was the final project of my undergraduate career. The original version, handed in a week ago was poorly constructed and fell apart immediately after class. I admit - I have a painter's vanity, and spent waaaay more time on the painting than the construction of the cube. So, with instructions from my professor to tweak some things and add some things, I re-worked the cube.

And lugged tons of heavy, delicate-and-flaky painted stone on a 90 minute commute back to school and reassembled it.

Aesthetically, my aim was to create something you could look at from multiple angles and keep discovering new things. Scientifically, I wanted to mess with the idea of the descent of a made-up winged trilobite: this idea changed into a whimsical look at the fossils and artifacts in the flying trilobite's soil.

Degree. Done!

Thanks to all my friends and family and bloggy friends and commenters for all their support. And especially, thanks to my wife Michelle for all of her encouragement and help in me going back to school. You rock.

I'll post grad photos in June.

You can see the process of this here: one, two, three, four.

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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow B.F.A.
under Creative Commons Licence.

Flying Trilobite Gallery *** Flying Trilobite Reproduction Shop ***

"How many wood glues died to make this project?! You monster!"

Last project underway

My last project for my undergraduate degree is underway.  Here's a snapshot to give you a glimpse at what I'm doing with all these slate pieces.
Danger! Wet oily trilobite!


Carrying wet oil paintings home on public transit (bus-->subway-->streetcar) from York U is always delightful, *cough* but someone stopped me to ask why I was carrying a trilobite fossil around.  That brightened my day.


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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.