Illustrating Vaccine Stories on Symbiartic



Over the weekend I was blogging on Symbiartic, the art+science blog I share with Kalliopi Monoyios. My focus was on images that undercut the scientific message they are trying to relay, specifically using posts about vaccines and pro-vaccination outreach. 

The comment threads are pretty lively and the discussion continued on Twitter and G+. 

Head over to Symbiartic to read, Pro-Vaccine Communication: You're Doing It Wrong.
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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite © to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

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Gamers for Godlessness 24 Hour Gameathonapalooza!


Lousy Canuck (Jason Thibeault) and JT Eberhard are currently engaged in a 24 hour long video gaming marathon, with guests Skyping in! Money raised goes to the fine people at Camp Quest and Women in Secularism.

I'll be joining them for a chat (and to help keep them awake) starting at about 1 am tonight!  Probably talk about atheism in comic book games, and I'm hoping to discuss Mass Effect and Assassin's Creed.

Oh - the little banner I whipped up, above, was made on my iPhone using Sketch Club with some lettering a cloning done in Photoshop afterward.

Visit them here!  You can comment and join in the fun.
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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite © to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

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Find me on Symbiartic, the art+science blog on the Scientific American Blog Network!

Explosions of activity

Detail from Incredible Hulk Anatomy.

Recent news from my studio:
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The Incredible Hulk Anatomy image did very well. 

  • Published it on Symbiartic, got some good traffic, over 70 Facebook Likes and a few comments there. 
  • Editor-in-chief of io9.com, Annalee Newitz published it there, and it's up to about 24000+ views in 4 days. 
  • This Tumblr-er posted it, and it's been re-shared and Liked more than 370+ times. 
  • I had some fun viewing it on Google Ripples.
  • My Symbiartic post about fine artist Marc Quinn's Self also got a shout-out on Gizmodo.


    I don't have time to do a lot of fan art: but it is a useful tool to getting noticed by a wider crowd, much like how many 90's goth bands did covers of popular Depeche Mode and New Order songs. It's a lot of fun to do though. Wonder what I should tackle next?  Always wanted to finish something with Cloak and Dagger. 

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    I revamped my professional portfolio online. 



Instead of awkwardly grouping artwork by mediums used (painting, drawing) as I used to do, I think I've made it a little more editor and art director friendly by arranging the galleries by topic. 
New galleries are:

Hopefully this makes it easier to navigate. I also tried to pick some really strong images for the first image in each gallery. 
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I'm pretty close to revealing some of the work I did earlier this year. It's my first time doing actual scientific illustration instead of the surreal stuff I'm usually commissioned to do, and I'm really pleased with how they turned out. After doing these, I think I shed my imposter-syndrome that flares up a bit when I consider myself a part of the science blogosphere. #Iamscience

For now, here's a little Instagram-preview of one of the images:

© Glendon Mellow



Expect more posts about this project pretty soon!  There's also 4 more projects in the works...


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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite © to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

Portfolio
Blog
Print Shop


Find me on Symbiartic, the art+science blog on the Scientific American Blog Network!

Science-Art Communication Specialist - it's now a thing

Changed my LinkedIn profile to read "Science-Art Communication Specialist". I've decided that's now a thing.



Although painting and illustrating are my first choice in career and I'm busier than ever with commissions, when I consider my blog writing at Symbiartic on Scientific American, the growing number of talks, podcasts and interviews and my new volunteer Board Member position with Science Art-Nature this seems like a more apt description. I find myself doing a lot of networking for and with other artists engaged in science, and slowly starting to hear from scientists looking for artists. I've been seriously considering turning it into a consulting business. 


I've developed a standard email I send out to artists contacting me about their science-art and asking for advice since it's happening more and more often. (And I don't mind at all!
Keep 'em coming.)

Here's what it typically says.

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I've added your blog to the Science Artists Feed (It's in the 2nd list that feeds into the first one...the first one filled up fast).  So when you have a show or update the bloggy portion in any way, it will appear on the Feed to subscribers, and on scienceblogging.org which is a huge aggregator site many science bloggers turn to to follow the many science blogging networks. 


I don't know if it will help traffic or eyeballs in any way, but it also helps me to stay on top of people's work, which I irregularly compile interesting links from and put in posts I call Scumbles. They used to be on my personal blog The Flying Trilobite, and I've moved them to Symbiartic since Scientific American asked me on board. 


So far the biggest impact the Science Artists Feed and Scumble posts have had is drawing together the disparate scattered science-inspired artists into a tighter community.  I've shared a Circle on G+of them in the past and more are talking on Twitter. I just finished up at my 4th trip to ScienceOnline this year, in North Carolina. Usually I've been one of 2 or 3 science-artists or illustrators out of a few hundred researchers and science journalists.  This year, there were about a dozen of us in attendance which had an impact. If you're on Twitter, an easy way into the community there is to use the #scienceart hashtag. 
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(For the interactive version of the image above, head over to Symbiartic and explore the image!) 





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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

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Find me on Symbiartic, the art+science blog on the new Scientific American Blog Network!

Inky Bidness

Coupla tattoo things. 

Fascinating personal post by paleo-author Brian Switek of Laelaps over at his other gig, Dinosaur Tracking, where he talks some more about the tattoo I designed for him not long ago. And hints at a second design possibly in the works. (I'm trying to see if it's possible to make a theropod's jaw open and close on Brian's flexing bicep.)

Check out his Allosaurus Ink, Brian has more recent, healed photos.  



Another tattoo I designed, the caffeine molecule for my SciAm peep Scicurious has long been one of my most popular all-time posts for getting traffic. Bound to happen then, that another internet denizen, Ryan S on Reddit has gotten a similar tattoo based on the design Sci and I came up with. 

Here it is on Scicurious:






I've also made a portfolio gallery of my science tattoo designs if you'd like to see more.


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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

Portfolio
Blog
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Find me on Symbiartic, the art+science blog on the new Scientific American Blog Network!

Pinterest Terms of Service link round-up


After posting recently about Pinterest, I've been involved in a lot of discussion about their Terms of Service.  Here's a quick link primer to some of the discussions I'm involved in and I'm seeing in the science-art blogosphere.

To recap:

Pinterest does a lot of things right: links back to creator's sites, deleted pins get deleted on all subsequent re-pins - these are good things.

Pinterest has some problems: most people pin whatever neato things they find online when the Terms specifically state you must own the image or have permission. So it's built on misuse in many ways. Personally I think more artists should use Creative Commons type attitudes toward this type of sharing. But the point stands that most users violate Pinterest's own Terms of Service.

Pinterest has some Peril: they can "sell" and "otherwise exploit" all content according to their Terms of Service. So if you use it correctly, you're giving away your work which then involves risk assessment.

Read through these links to get the whole picture so far.

Pinterest gets right what Tumblr got wrong - The Flying Trilobite by Glendon Mellow

The Promise and Perils of Pinterest - Symbiartic by Glendon Mellow

-->Discussion on G+
-->Discussion on Scientific American's Facebook Page

Pinterest's Terms of Service, Word by Terrifying Word _Symbiartic by my co-blogger, Kalliopi Monoyios.

ART Evolved is a No-Pin Zone, sadly... -ART Evolved by administrator Craig Dylke. I'm affiliated with ART Evolved but I wasn't involved in this decision beforehand, for the record. Good move though.

*****Edit: It was announced on March 23rd 2012 that Pinterest is indeed dropping the "sell" term in their Terms of Service - as well as making many other changes. Storify below takes place as of time of the original post.

Pinterest updates Terms of Service - drops the "sell" - Symbiartic by Glendon Mellow



For those not on Twitter, after the jump I've included a first attempt at a Storify of some of the comments there.



There's a lot of retweets of some of these, so a lot of people are listening who haven't weighed in.




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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

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--> Find me on Symbiartic, the art+science blog on the new Scientific American Blog Network!

Symbiartic spreading its wings


Since scientific illustrator Kalliopi Monoyios and I launched Symbiartic: the art of science and the science of art on the Scientific American Blog Network last month, we've been trying to challenge ourselves and our readers with our posts.

Science-inspired art is everywhere these days, and there's so much of and so many fascinating issues about the technology, about the ethics of scientific accuracy in art, and about the people behind it, I'm so excited we're bringing these issues and images to a larger audience. And I think it's working: more artists than ever before are contacting us by email, Twitter, G+ and Facebook, and I'm really happy with the traffic on Symbiartic.

In case your one of my regular Flying Trilobite readers and you haven't checked out Symbiartic yet, here's a quick rundown of all the posts on Symbiartic to date, in blog-style reverse chronology:

Alone in the blogiverse: where are all the space-art bloggers? - Glendon Mellow.

Tagging Science Art - Glendon Mellow. A look at science-based street art for Scientific American's Cities event.

Tools change, view is the same - Glendon Mellow.

Science-art Scumble #22 - Glendon Mellow. I moved these popular posts rounding up links on science-art from The Flying Trilobite to Scientific American, and began featuring a pic of the week.

How bad images rob science (and good ones don't) - Kalliopi Monoyios.

What does a scientific glassblower make? - Kalliopi Monoyios.  I swear, this could be a whole new career in steampunk genres.

Science-art Scumble #21 - Paleo Controversy Edition - Glendon Mellow.

We Blew a Bubble for a Man Named Edison - Kalliopi Monoyios.

The Chemistry of Oil Painting - Glendon Mellow.

Science-art Scumble #20 - Glendon Mellow.

Meet the Future of Photography - Kalliopi Monoyios.

To © is Human - Glendon Mellow.

The DNA Hall of Shame - Kalliopi Monoyios.

Science-art Scumble - Glendon Mellow. The first Scumble not on Flying Trilobite.

Magic Beans - Glendon Mellow.

The Dudley Bug - Glendon Mellow.

5 Reasons Your Camera Won't Steal My Job - Kalliopi Monoyios.

Science-art: don't call it 'art' - Glendon Mellow

Visual beings: meet Symbiartic - Kalliopi Monoyios. Our introductory post!

Check it out, leave comments, let us know about your science-art! 

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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

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Lookee here--> Find me on Symbiartic, the art+science blog on the new Scientific American Blog Network!

Scumble #18 - Science-art is the future! Edition

Scumble:
"A painting technique in which semi-opaque or thin opaque colors are loosely brushed over an underpainted area so that patches of the color beneath show through." 
From The Artist's Handbook, by Ray Smith.  

Highlighting recent posts I found interesting, provocative, or otherwise caught my eye from the Science Artists Feed, and other sources.

Science-art is becoming an increasingly popular form of science communication and entertainment. Drawing from fine art, laboratory work, scientific illustration, concept art and more, watch how artists spread scientific literacy and play with the inspiring concepts in science. 



Make yourself a cup of joe,  put your feet up and enjoy the science-art and art techniques!


Click here for earlier Scumbles.


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World Science Festival 11: The Invisible Language of Smell - Bora Zivkovic with illustrations by Perrin Ireland, Scientific American's Guest Blog. Find more of Perrin Ireland's work at Small n Tender and Bora Zivkovic's at A Blog Around the Clock.

Using the iPad as a Portfolio - Darkstorm Creative: the Work of Russell Dickerson. A couple of years back, I blogged about the iPod Touch as a portfolio. Can't wait to get an iPad. Check out Russell's unsettling horror work while you're there.

"Picturing science" exhibit reveals the artistic beauty of scientific research - Alasdair Wilkins, io9.com.

ScienceArt-Nature-Home - Stanford. This in-process site looks promising, and check out the roster of contributors: includes Carel Brest van Kempen.

Networks are not always revolutionary - Cory Doctorow, The Guardian.

Hominid Skulls wearing Mexican Wrestler Masks - The Flying Trilobite. An example of a failed contract.

CaridianBCT - Quantum Cell Expansion System - XVIVO Science Animation Blog.

EXOSKELETONS...solo show in Melbourne - A Curious Bestiary - art by Kaitlin Beckett. I wish I could see this amazing work in person!

Titration! - Katy's Notebook.

L is for Lacewing - Curious Art Lab by Leah Palmer Preiss.

Art Talk with Marna Stalcup, The Right-Brain Initiative - Art Works.

Mathematics breathes new life into Escher's art - Jacob Aron, CultureLab.

Vintage Dinosaur Art: The Bird Hunter - Love in the Time of the Chasmosaurs.

Earliest art in the Americas: Ice Age Image of Mammoth or Mastodon found in Florida - ScienceDaily.

Of Paintings and Other Things - The Caw Box

Art and Science Team-up for Biophysical Journal - cover artist Klaus Schulten, biophysical society.

Immortal - Is this bioart?

Inter-active Broadcast: Illusion of Certainty - Sci-ence

Kinect for Windows SDK Coding Marathon - The Art of Wa.com

The Mysteryes of Nature and Art - BibliOdyssey. (hat-tip to Michael Barton!)

Evolution - Darryl Cunningham Investigates. Webcomic about evolution!


Pick of the Scumble:
Wallace and his Flying Frogs! - Alfred Wallace Website. Amazing art by Joanna Barnum. (Another tip of the hat to Mr. Barton!)

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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow under Creative Commons Licence.

Scumble #17 - Best Science-Art Links this week

Scumble:
"A painting technique in which semi-opaque or thin opaque colors are loosely brushed over an underpainted area so that patches of the color beneath show through." 
From The Artist's Handbook, by Ray Smith.  

Highlighting recent posts I found interesting, provocative, or otherwise caught my eye from the Science Artists Feed, and other sources. 


Time to slow cold-brew yourself a caramel bulee latte, put your feet up and enjoy the science-art and art techniques!


Click here for earlier Scumbles.

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Stop on Red: the Effects of Color May Lie Deep in Evolution - Science Daily. Inherited aversion to red as the study suggests, or convergent learning that red means blood by chimps and humans?

Fluid Dynamics: Watch as 'Mixed Color' comes back together right before your eyes - Geekologie. Somewhere, there's a grad student in a fine art program salivating at doing this with many automated jars in a gallery.

Scientific "proof" that abstract art is only 4% better than what a kid could do - Alasdair Wilkins, io9.com.

This is why we can't have nice things - Sci-ənce. Informative, demented webcomic.

Interview with Jim Robins - 
Dave Hone's Archosaur Musings. Darwin fans should check out the fun anachronistic cartoon at the bottom of the interview (should be young Darwin but what the hey - funny cartoon.)

How are art and human evolution related? - Greg Laden's Blog. Does neolithic cave art represent doodles, rituals or recipies?

GNSI Annual Exhibit Sneak Peek - Guild of Natural Science Illustrator's blog. Must see! Check out the bees.

Dino Brights! - Omegafauna. Artist/designer Sharon Lynn Wegner-Larsen makes all paleo folk jealous of her toys.

Butter Tarts - Trilobite Boy #6 - Trilobite Boy. My webcomic experiment continues.

nature/culture/nature/culture - Is this bioart? Sometimes I think this blog and my blog should discuss the terms science-art and bioart and then arm wrestle.

Scaphognathus crassirostris: A Pterosaur in the Historical Record? - David Orr, Love in the Time of the Chasmosaurs. Cryptozoology FTW!

Art and Human Evolution - for the Beaker and Brush series - Hybrids of Art and Science. Very cool and optimistic scienceart quote.

Summer, learning and children - Darkstorm Creative, the art of Russell Dickerson. I've followed Russell's art avidly for a while now.  Great post about encouraging children to explore.

WIP - baby elephant - Heather Ward Wildlife Art. Spooky at this stage! Great insight into technique.

I'm now a member of the IAAA! - LucyJain's Blog. Lucy is among the hottest new astronomy-artists out there -extend congrats and then gape slack-jawed at her tremendous gallery.

Painting Through the Universe: Eskimo Nebula - Katy's Notebook. Katy Chalmers is the other hot new astronomy artist out there, and, like Lucy Jain is one of the very best astronomy artists today. Why don't more astronomy artists blog?  I dunno. Follow these two though to space in new ways. Eskimo Nebula is gorgeous in a way abstract art can't touch.

David Johnson - lines and colors. Check out the portraits of Albert Einstein, Daniel Dennett, Richard Dawkins and Sam Harris!

Hidden Treasures - Biodiversity in Focus. This blog is making me feel inspired by fruit flies. Like, more than usual.

The Dragons of Malaysia by Ryan and AI:The Impossible Museum by Brian G George - Mad Art Lab. Very cool DIY art project about the sacred space in museums led to a very cool question: what would you want to see in an impossible museum?  Check out the comments & leave your own.

Making Art of Traumatic Heart Failure - Christine Ottery, CultureLab.

MizEnScen - Street Anatomy.

Blog post of the Scumble:  Wedding - Weapon of Mass Imagination. Congratulations to 3D paleo-artist and one of the masterminds behind ART Evolved, Craig Dylke and his bride Lady R!  They got married!

Scienceart of the Scumble: Archaeopteryx - Bond's Blog. 

© Peter Bond 2011 under CCL.

Gorgeous pair of Archaeopteryx by Peter Bond, for Craig Dylke's wedding! Check out Bond's Blog for a peek at one of his sketches for this stunning painting. 






- - - - - - - Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow under Creative Commons Licence.