Science-Art Scumble #9

Scumble:
"A painting technique in which semi-opaque or thin opaque colors are loosely brushed over an underpainted area so that patches of the color beneath show through." 
From The Artist's Handbook, by Ray Smith.  

A weekly digest to highlight some of the posts I found most interesting, most provocative, or otherwise caught my eye from the Science Artists Feed, and other sources. Sit back, have an espresso and enjoy.


Click here for earlier scumbles.

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The Elephant Gallery, Art Evolved.  Bimonthly paleo-art themed gallery.  Don't miss cute/sad Craig Dylke's 3D mammoth and Lucy Walsh's highly detailed African elephant.  Also check out David Maas's speedpainted entry.

Hello, I'm an Atheist: Awe, Science, Reason and Critical Thinking.

Of These Bones & Branches, this is the blog of Heather Thompkins.

Project Art for Nature: On The Edge, ArtPlantae Today.  Important and impactful art+conservation event.

Is it art or a dorsal vertebra? , drip|david's really interesting pages. Ooo, an excellent question. Is context everything?

Sirius alabaster, Nobu Tamura. Breathtaking.

New Year... New Traumador, Weapon of Mass Imagination.

Lovely Weather, the End of Astronomy and the Need for ArtSci socio-economic indicators, Roger Malina.  Are scientist and artist collaborations worth the money?  Can that be determined?

Hendrick Avercamp and the "Little Ice Age", lines and colors.

The Street Anatomy Gallery Store is OPEN! , Street Anatomy.

Pilot and co-pilot fish, A Curious Bestiary.

Chromatic Adaptation, Gurney Journey.


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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow

Science-Art Scumble #8: Super Holiday Special!

Scumble:
"A painting technique in which semi-opaque or thin opaque colors are loosely brushed over an underpainted area so that patches of the color beneath show through." 
From The Artist's Handbook, by Ray Smith.  


A weekly digest to highlight some of the posts I found most interesting, most provocative, or otherwise caught my eye from the Science Artists Feed, and other sources. Sit back, have a cinnamon-laced eggnog and enjoy.


There are enough Holiday pieces of science-based art out there, I hadda put them into one post!  Please enjoy this special edition of the Science-Art Scumble.

Click here for earlier scumbles.



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Holiday Card Candidate, Clever Girl.  Double does of holiday fun!  Jennifer Hall's Christmas card plus check out her blog banner. Does the Abominable Snowman proud, that does.

Tomorrow Night: "The Vast Santanic Conspiracy: Is St. Nick the Tool of a Plot too Monstrous To Mention?" With Cult-Author Mark Dery at Observatory, Morbid Anatomy.

Holiday Wish List 2010, Art Works.

Krismas Sketch, The Flying Trilobite.

Imagining Flower Fairies, Gurney Journey.  (My wife and I cover our Christmas tree in fairies, so this counts as holiday art in my book!)

Kroper's Guide to Holiday Shopping, Ataraxia Theatre.

Christmas Paleo-Art, Salaric.

Happy Holidays from Morbid Anatomy and Friends, Morbid Anatomy.

Happy Holidays, The Disillusioned Taxonomist.

Wintry Wishes from Witton, Love in the Time of the Chasmosaurs.

Forgotten Christmas Specials Part 1 and Part 2, Tricia's Obligatory Art Blog!  (Not necessarily science-y, but great clips!)

All the best of the holidays, everyone!  Merry Krismas!
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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

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Science-Art Scumble #7

Scumble:
"A painting technique in which semi-opaque or thin opaque colors are loosely brushed over an underpainted area so that patches of the color beneath show through." 
From The Artist's Handbook, by Ray Smith.  

A weekly digest to highlight some of the posts I found most interesting, most provocative, or otherwise caught my eye from the Science Artists Feed, and other sources. Sit back, have an espresso and enjoy.

This week, there are not only entries from deviantArt, but I've also added some photography and comics.

Note: the Scumble may stumble some time over the next couple of weeks - my wife and I are expecting our first child, and I may take a break so I can dress the newborn up like a reindeer.

Click here for earlier scumbles.

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The Mighty V-Rex, The Art of a Carbon-Based Lifeform.

Jungle Hunt, Scenes From A Multiverse.

Lunar Eclipse of the Blog, Biodiversity in Focus.  Morgan D. Jackson goes from photographing very small, up close insects to photographing something very big and far away! Stellar.

Stuff I like: Centrifuge Tubes, A Curious Bestiary.

Confetti Death, Street Anatomy.

Scientific Accuracy in Art, Scientific American Guest Blog, by yours truly. Comments on this post encouraged!

The Golden Ratio or Fibonacci Spiral, Darkstorm Creative: the works of Russell Dickerson.  An entertaining look at how Fibonacci sequences crop up in Dickerson's art.

Aquaephemera: slo-mo water sculpture, Bioephemera.

Galileo's Controversial Moon Drawings, Maggie Koerth-Baker, Boing Boing.

Swill is here!  Swill is here! , Renaissance Oaf.

Scientists tackle graphic design, O'Reilly Science Art.

Tree Books for Kids, ArtPlantae Today.

Uncle Beazley, Love in the Time of the Chasmosaurs.

Elephant Live-Blogging Event, Art Evolved.  Two of Art Evolved's admins live blog making artwork about prehistoric elephants. Craig Dylke renders in 3D (start here) and Peter Bond starts off with traditional drawing (start here).

Member News: Hall Train featured in local radio "Dinosaur Phone-In", SONSI.


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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

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Science-Art Scumble #6

Scumble:
"A painting technique in which semi-opaque or thin opaque colors are loosely brushed over an underpainted area so that patches of the color beneath show through." 
From The Artist's Handbook, by Ray Smith.  

A weekly digest to highlight some of the posts I found most interesting, most provocative, or otherwise caught my eye from the Science Artists Feed, and other sources. Sit back, have an espresso and enjoy.

Note: the Scumble may stumble some time over the next couple of weeks - my wife and I are expecting our first child, and I may take a break so I can stare at the baby.

Click here for earlier scumbles.

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What is Science-Art? , The Flying Trilobite.

Live not by visualization alone - Gene Expression

Historians discover letters and numbers in Mona Lisa's eyes, Yahoo7.  (Hat-tip to Sarah Kavassalis.)

Transparent Specimens, Deep Sea News.

Unpopular Science - NY Times, An Eye for Science.

Louis XIV - The science king - CultureLab.

Paracyclophus, Love in the Time of the Chasmosaurs.  Comic-hero dinosaurs!

Bubble and squeak 2010, A Distant Ugly Mountain.

Protesting global warming - one melting figure at a time, Hybrids of Art and Science.

Winners of the Evolution & Art Contest! , Charlie's Playhouse Blog

Creativity is Serious Business, Art Works: National Endowment for the Arts.

Growing up with art, Gurney Journey.

WIP Jaguar - Starting the Detail Work, Heather Ward Wildlife Art.

Science-Artist Feed grows to 100, The Flying Trilobite.

Parasitic Trilobites, The Episiarch.

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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

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Science-Artists Feed grows to 100

A few months ago, I started the Science-Artists Feed after a conversation with Bora Zivkovic.  It's also carried on scienceblogging.com. Visual art, illustration and imagery can have a profound impact on our understanding of science: both the scientific concepts themselves, and how scientific knowledge impacts our lives.

It's now swelled to 100 different artists' and site feeds!  Each week I'm summing up some links of things I found interesting in my Scumble series of posts. If anyone wondered whether or not this is an art movement unto itself -as I discussed with Mike Haubrich and sciartist Lynn Fellman in a recent podcast- the size and variety of this list should demonstrate it is.

Recently, I included a handful of the artists I love from deviantArt as well, including Nobu Tamura, Jacqueline Dillard, Jon Lomberg and the Bioscience group.

Here's the list in its entirety below the jump:




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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

Science-Art Scumble #5




Scumble:
"A painting technique in which semi-opaque or thin opaque colors are loosely brushed over an underpainted area so that patches of the color beneath show through." 
From The Artist's Handbook, by Ray Smith.  

A weekly digest to highlight some of the posts I found most interesting, most provocative, or otherwise caught my eye from the Science Artists Feed. Sit back, have a coffee and enjoy.


Click here for earlier scumbles.  Lots of fish & ocean life this week.
And let me know if you enjoy the Scumbles in the comments below! 
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Fun fish in Black and White, Changewind's Ink.

Mineo's Ray, Ichthyography.

Fleam Find, Curious Art Lab.

On Atheists Talk radio with Lynn Fellman, The Flying Trilobite.  Me, talking about science art on the radio with Lynn Fellman and Mike Haubrich.

Sandra Yagi, Street Anatomy.

Sciart quote of the day, Bioephemera.

Red-Green Color Blindness Test Lines, An Eye for Science.

ABC, Street Anatomy.

Ocean Invasion #9: Lionfish 1, Springbok 0, Laughing Mantis Studios.

Picturing Sounds: How to paint a Led Zeppelin song, CultureLab.

Walcott's Quarry #124: Post-Apocalyptic, eTrilobite.

Derek Nobbs Is My New Favourite Artist, Deep Sea News.

Aeroplasmic Curds, A Distant Ugly Mountain.

Paleoart Competition, Art Evolved.

Biocurious? Interview with Joseph Jackson about DIY Biotech, Ars Biologica.

Elasmosaur Watercolor, Coherent Lighthouse.

Alexis Rockman, lines and colors.  Unreal landscapes filled with prehistoric creatures.

Sea Dragon Shirts! , A Curious Bestiary.  This is by one of my very favourite artists who I wish I could buy a coffee and hang out and sketch with.

Deeper into Dinosaurgami, Love in the Time of the Chasmosaurs.

Piracy in the age of DIYbio, DIYBio.


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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

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Science-Art Scumble #4


Scumble:
"A painting technique in which semi-opaque or thin opaque colors are loosely brushed over an underpainted area so that patches of the color beneath show through." 
From The Artist's Handbook, by Ray Smith.  

A weekly digest to highlight some of the posts I found most interesting, most provocative, or otherwise caught my eye from the Science Artists Feed. Sit back, have a coffee and enjoy.


Click here for earlier scumbles.
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Foraminiferal Sculpture Park: a question of scales, Geology in Art.

Darwinian Theory of Beauty, Gurney Journey.  James Gurney's straight-on take about Denis Dutton's recent TEDTalk.

Making my own dinosaur, The Tyrannosaur Chronicles. Kid-friendly site!

Color and Light: A Guide for the Realist Painter, lines and colors. Charley Parker reviews James Gurney's new incredible book, which in part grew out of Gurney's blog posts.

The "Lost Women": science popularizers and communicators in the 19th century, Bioephemera.

Pink Dinosaur Wrap-Up, Art Evolved.  Admin & catalyst for this charity drive Peter Bond gives us a grand finale: all 248 pink dinosaurs created by dozens of artists collaged together in a single image.

The artwork has changed drastically between conception and execution.  Therefore it has no meaning, The Art of a Carbon-Based Lifeform.

Slide lecture given about biomimicry, Hybrids of Art and Science.

Sketching at the Royal Ontario Museum, News from the Studio. 



Walcott's Quarry #123: Waiting it Out, eTrilobite.

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Great science-art posts not in the Feed:

An artist's interpretation of a teenager's head exploding in science class, A Journey Around My Skull.

Geology History in Caricatures: Dr. M. in extasies at the approach of his pet Saurian, History of Geology.

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For next week:

There's been a change on deviantArt, that popular website for artists.  They now have RSS feeds for individual galleries.  I'll be adding a few of these to the Science Artists Feed for next week, including some of my favourite artists who consistently challenge and delight.

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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.


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Science-Art Scumble #3

Scumble:
"A painting technique in which semi-opaque or thin opaque colors are loosely brushed over an underpainted area so that patches of the color beneath show through." 
From The Artist's Handbook, by Ray Smith.  

A weekly digest to highlight some of the posts I found most interesting, most provocative, or otherwise caught my eye from the Science Artists Feed. Sit back, have a coffee and enjoy.


Click here for earlier scumbles

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Old Paintings, Omegafauna.

Artist Organization Goes Virtual, Britt Griswold, Guild of Natural Science Illustrators.

Big Bang Ball makes a Big Bang, Britt Griswold, Guild of Natural Science Illustrators.

More Life of the Cell Animation, Boulders 2 Bits.

War Paint: Styracosaurus, The Optimistic Painting Blog

The Space Age Enters the Stone Age, Visual Science

Andrew Vomhof Mapps the Cosmos in the Rings of Time, Hybrids of Art and Science.
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These next few posts weren't in the Feed, since their blogs don't primarily deal in science-art.  Check these out!

Closer than Expected, Dan Dos Santos - Muddy Colors.  (Art and life comparison with astronauts.)

Giant Isopod Stained Glass panel, Deep Sea News.

San Francisco: Imaginary Foundation art show and pop-up shop, Boing Boing.

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Original artwork on
The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under
Creative Commons Licence.
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Blog
Print Shop

Science-Art Scumble #2


Scumble:
"A painting technique in which semi-opaque or thin opaque colors are loosely brushed over an underpainted area so that patches of the color beneath show through." 
From The Artist's Handbook, by Ray Smith.  

A weekly digest to highlight some of the posts I found most interesting, most provocative, or otherwise caught my eye from the Science Artists Feed. Sit back, have a coffee and enjoy.

Click here for earlier scumbles.

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Leonardo Thinks: new blog section, Roger Malina.

Medical imaging used to probe Tower of London mural, CultureLab.   

For the Fallen, eTrilobite.  (Science-art only possible in a free society.  Thanks Marek.)

How long does it take for you to look at a painting? (James Elkins), lines and colors.

Sprout utility ventricle, A distant ugly mountain.  (I see an ear: what do you see in this new painting by the inimitable Chris Hutson?)

The Duomo and the Dinosaur, Stories in Stone.  (Not in the feed, don't miss this!)

Amazon is Amoral and Complicit, Renaissance Oaf.

The Person You Love is 72.8% Water - Teagan White, Street Anatomy.


A bioart experience resembling a TSA millimeter-wave scan - performed by bacteria. (Would you respond to this ad?), Bioephemera.


Tuco-tuco, Changedwind's Ink.

The Angel Academy of Art, Gurney Journey.  (Interesting debate in the comments.) 

The Lanzendorf Collection, Love in the Time of the Chasmosaurs. 

Pink Dinosaur #248: Our Final Submission!, Art Evolved.  (Bravo to Peter Bond and everyone who made this charity drive so much fun.)

Two Upcoming Events at the Hunterian Museum in London, Morbid Anatomy.  

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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.


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